Installation day at Humbolt TLC- Sticks in a Bundle Never Break!

  
The first broom-corn in the township was grown by Col. John Cofer in 1865. His first planting was two bushels of Tennessee evergreen, in the extreme northeast portion of the township. The industry increased annually, and from 1870 to 1890 about 10,000 acres were grown yearly. Since then the acreage has gradually shrunk, and in 1904 about 2,500 acres were planted.
Students working on the elements of the installation, gesso burlap and canes.
 Collective work and responsibility, a perfect example of sticks in a bundle never breaking. The sticks will be suspended from the trees in the garden. The garden is a scared space on the TLC campus, every spring the students learn about gardening, and tending the garden as part of their curriculum thanks to Amy Wettig & Rich Holtz, coordinating teachers.
 
 
 Burlap, acrylic paint, plastic ties
 Spirit flags were hung in the trees, like trapped kites, on strings, they also attached the creative currency words to live by symbols from the trees, and attached them to the fence.

The grass was added to the  fence post, bundled with three types of grass.
Humbolt Township (spelled in Government publications "Humboldt") is one of the prettiest, the wealthiest and most productive townships ships of the county.  
TLC's outdoor installation was a team effort, thanks to the staff that came out to help, with the Thursday morning install. We draped the tree in the garden corner, the area is used for the compose pile. In the Spring and Summer months the tree provide a shady spot,staff and students use it for a sitting area. The volunteers Terry Smith, donated bundles of harvested wild-grass the left over grass was used to skirt the tree.
The school is surrounded by 40 arches of land, as far as the eyes can see. So we adorned the fence with Adinkra symbols.
 

 Kit Morice- Education Curator at Tarble Arts Center
IT WAS THE COLDEST DAY OF THE YEAR AND WE WERE OUT IN IT! HIGH FIVE FOR THE TLC YOUNG WORKSHOP ARTISTS.
The residency is funded by the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency, by participating schools, the Coles County Arts Council, and Tarble membership contributions. The Tarble Arts Center, a division of the College of Arts & Humanities, is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums

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